Aug
22
2014

How To Open A Young Coconut

  Posted In blog

    Post a Comment

    Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

    *
    *

    Aug
    21
    2014

    Lumberjack 20 Event

    Jumberjack-20

    What are you doing on Saturday September 6th? I’m not going to tell you how to run your life, but if you’re smart, you’ll be hanging out with me at TwinTown and throwing down with a bunch of other people on this gnarly workout called the Lumberjack 20! It’s been a couple months since our last event and we need to take advantage of the beautiful weather while we can.

    We are charging $20 to participate and will be donating all proceeds to the family of our brother Terry Clapp who passed away last Spring. 9 person heats will be starting every 45 minutes beginning at 9:00, and there are 3 divisions available so scaling to any ability level will be no big deal. We will be accommodating for everyone, so if you have specific concerns on how to scale please ask your coach what the best modifications are. Here’s how the workout and scaling levels break down…

    20 Deadlifts (275/225/185#) (185/155/105#)
    Run 400m
    20 KB swings (70/53/35#) (53/35/26#)
    Run 400m
    20 Overhead Squats (115/85/45#) (85/65/35#)
    Run 400m
    20 Burpees
    Run 400m
    20 Pullups (C2B/Pull-up/Ring Row)
    Run 400m
    20 Box jumps (24/20/20”) (24/20/16”)
    Run 400m
    20 DB Squat Cleans (45/35/25#) (35/25/15#)
    Run 400m

    You will need to sign up on Zen Planner in advance, so please head over there and get yourself signed up! There will be a warm-up written for you before you start, but the time that you sign up for is when you begin the workout. Plan to be there at least a half hour before your start time to get through a thorough warm-up. As always, friends and family are more than welcome to come cheer you on, so feel free to invite people to the event. Saturday the 6th, it’s on. See you then!

      Posted In blog

      Post a Comment

      Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

      *
      *

      Aug
      20
      2014

      This Friday, We Bowl

      imgres

      We’re getting together at the Bryant Lake Bowl this Friday evening for some bowling, food, and drinks and would love your company! We have lanes reserved from 5-7 and will be ordering some eats to feed your hungry post-workout bellies. Come hang out with some familiar faces, meet a couple new ones and get your bowl on with us!

      RSVP for the Facebook event here.

        Posted In blog

        Post a Comment

        Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

        *
        *

        Aug
        18
        2014

        Utilizing The Muscle Up For Nordic Skiing

        As a power endurance sport, Nordic skiing utilizes every major muscle group in the human body. Among the two basic disciplines (classic and skate), classic skiing resembles the prehistoric method utilized in the back country of northern European countries in order to hunt, deliver, and perform military duties. Classic skiing has four basic components; the stride, the double pole, the double pole kick, and the hearing bone.

        Being able to pull your body on skis requires core control, coordination, and massive upper and lower body strength. Like all power endurance sports being able to expend energy and strength relative to body weight is incredibly important. Pull-ups have always been one of the movements every skier is required to be proficient at. In the offseason Kikkan Randal, probably the greatest U.S female skier, talks about the importance of the movement in this Wall Street Journal Article. No doubt it is incredibly important to be able to pull your own weight over a bar, however I’ve been surprised to see that a lot of the major teams and training groups don’t utilize a movement that has a direct skill transfer to the double pole technique which require the same core control: that movement would be the muscle up.

        Double Poling, much like rowing, consists of the catch, the finish, and the recovery. IMG_0052 At the starting phase the skier has his arms almost locked out in order to start the movement. Using his or her core the skier then catches the snow. Does the left-most position look familiar?  In the gym we call that the hollow, which we utilize constantly.  This is the exact same position you are in to initialize the pull of the muscle up. Afterword, the skier does a full crunch. One could easily argue, this is the same as doing a dip.  At the finish, the arms are completely locked out and the skier comes back to full extension.

        The muscle up consists of the same three basic components and utilizes the hollow and the dip in the same way double poling does.

        1. The Start.

        photo

        2. Hollowing out

        photo 4-2

        Notice the the absolute similarity between this picture and figure two in the picture above.

        3. The Catch

         

        photo 1-1

        There is no doubt here that this exactly the same as the catch for skiing.  Look at the skiers 3rd and 4th positions on the picture above.

        4. The Finish

         

        photo 4

        Notice the similarity in the lock out position after the dip.  To get a legitimate rep on the muscle up you must be fully locked out.  The same is true for double poling.

        While programming for the aerobic conditioning and capacity training cohort I noticed this similarity.  I would encourage all you skiers to become proficient at muscle ups in order to get maximum power for classic skiing.

         

          Posted In blog

          Post a Comment

          Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

          *
          *

          Aug
          15
          2014

          Soooo what’s up with Minneapolis Barbell?

          photo 1

          What exactly is Minneapolis Barbell? When can I go? How do I get in on it? Consider all of your questions answered here!

          Over the past month or so, I polled many members of TwinTown Fitness for input regarding schedules as well as preferred programming. THANK YOU ALL for your feedback. From those conversations, our testing platform was created.

          Great, so what’s going on there NOW?
          I am working with six of your fellow TwinTowners as a test group. These folks have given up eight weeks to be a part of this test group. Simply put, we are testing everything from schedules to programming, working out kinks before rolling out classes to the whole TwinTown community.

          Why does there need to be a test group?
          To make Minneapolis Barbell the best we can for everyone! By working out our bugs with a test group, we will be able to change anything that may not work or could be better, so we can provide the best possible training experience when Minneapolis Barbell goes live.

          What else?
          The MBB test session runs from Aug. 4th to Sept 26th. MBB will open to the TwinTown Fitness community on or near Oct 1st. We want to share our happenings and progress with everyone so feel free to inquire about how it’s going, cheer us on and watch for photos and updates!

          Great enthusiasm from everyone behind Minneapolis Barbell. Can’t wait to kick it off in October!

            Posted In blog

            Post a Comment

            Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

            *
            *

            Aug
            14
            2014

            Dip & Drive

            10609537_843658422319022_5066530848857314052_n

            The last three days in our all levels classes we have had a variation of the push press. I’m no psychic by any stretch, but I assume we will see them again soon.

            This seems like such an easy movement, however many things can go wrong in a hurry.

            If you have been in any of these classes you have definitely heard to send your hips back and drive through your heels. This feels very awkward, and if you have followed these cues, I’m sure we are in agreement.

            It feels more natural to bend into our knees and push through our toes extending our calves to get the weight up. And we can probably get quicker results this way.

            However, you are putting your body in a vulnerable position. You will undoubtedly feel it more in your knees, ankles, calfs and lower back.

            Personally, I have struggled for a long time with the correct sequencing. I know what it is supposed to look like, I know how to cue others to do it, but when it comes to execution I don’t follow through.

            Until now!!! My good friend and workout partner, Keela had me practice reps against the wall, while maintaining a vertical torso, then stepping away and pretending myback was still against that wall while going through the push press motion.

            After my first training session with these cues in mind, I am already moving a lot better throughout the movement. There is still much room for improvement, but I feel this is the biggest step I have taken on conquering the push press.

            The next time you are in class working on the push press, remember these cues!

              Posted In blog

              Post a Comment

              Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

              *
              *

              Aug
              13
              2014

              Track Sprints Recap

              Here are a couple photos from the sprints that went down this bast weekend for our TwinTown people that are not on Facebook (if you are and haven’t seen them yet, you can check out the entire set here). We had a great group show up and it was a blast getting to watch everyone work their butts off!

              Keep an eye out for more track days in the near future too. We still need to get some accurate times for people’s best on the 800m and mile!

              10014953_844533758898155_1223306264858700565_o

               

              10557741_844533708898160_2582027955948337536_o

               

              10448482_844533642231500_4372970978088170159_o

               

              10511541_844533842231480_2150424291851205594_o

               

              10549218_844533795564818_8239241942624435029_o

                Posted In blog

                Post a Comment

                Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

                *
                *

                Aug
                12
                2014

                Double Under Clinic Reminder

                Drawing_of_Girl_Jumping_RopeThe time has come to twist arms.  Double-unders are imperative to your success in any work out that involves bounding or requires agility and finesse, not just workouts that require double-unders.  Additionally we have now seen regional workouts and big competitions that are programming triple-unders.

                If you want to raise your game I highly suggest you come to my double-under clinic this Saturday the 16th at 12:30.  I also would encourage those of you having problems “unleashing” your wrists to attend as we will implement specific drills to help combat this common nuisance.  You can sign up here.  Hope to see you there.

                  Posted In blog

                  Post a Comment

                  Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

                  *
                  *

                  Aug
                  11
                  2014

                  My Bulletproof Mocha Recipe

                  Bulletproof Mocha from Teddy Kim.

                    Posted In blog, recipe

                    Post a Comment

                    Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

                    *
                    *

                    Aug
                    08
                    2014

                    Practice. We talking about practice.

                    AI

                    We’re talking about practice man. What are we talking about? Practice? I mean listen, we’re talking about practice, not a game, we ain’t talking about the game. We’re talking about practice. ~Allen Iverson, in response to a reporter’s question about his lackadaisical effort in practice.

                    It’s rare when an athlete has the natural talent to just show up and let it rip during a game like AI. Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks is another athlete that comes to mind. But most professional athletes work tirelessly perfecting their craft.

                    Whether it’s an NHL star working on his skating or firing puck after puck at an empty net in the off-season; a professional basketball player shooting 100 jump shots after a game; or a professional golfer spending hours hitting bunker shots before heading to the putting green, practice is crucial to their success.

                    Why? Because practice is where you create a polished result by honing your skills and developing excellent technique.

                    The same is true for you in your athletic endeavors. You can’t expect to just show up on one-rep-max day and throw a PR over your head. It doesn’t work this way.

                    You have to put in the time drilling the details, getting down and dirty with the minutiae of complicated lifts like the snatch and clean & jerk.

                    If you practice the right way you will have the small, technical aspects of the movement dialed in when you show up to the gym to test your one rep max.

                    Taking the time to painstakingly master the basics is the only way you will excel in your athletic pursuits.

                    I want to be a better golfer, but I don’t have the time to practice as much as I need to in order to be consistently good. So I have to make the most of my practice sessions.

                    When I go to the driving range I don’t just pound balls with no purpose. I show up with a game plan.

                    I take shots that gave me trouble in previous rounds and groove my swing so I can execute during an actual round of golf. I do this by practicing situations I will face on the golf course.

                    For example, I’ll hit 15 fades over an imaginary water hazard to practice bringing the ball in high so it will land softly. Then I’ll hit 20 low draws under an imaginary tree to practice running the ball on to the green from trouble.

                    You can do the same thing with your lifts.

                    What was the sticking point the last time you snatched? Were you shorting your extension, dropping under the bar prematurely? Maybe your timing was off on your jerk.

                    Pay attention when you’re lifting in class. Pick the one, two, or three things that give you the most trouble and work them out during technique work in our warmups, at open gym, or at home with a broomstick.

                    Greatness requires commitment and a game plan.

                      Posted In blog

                      Post a Comment

                      Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

                      *
                      *